Welcome to BrayScore 

A BrayScore is not a cut "grade." It is much more accurate. It summarizes pertinent data regarding the cut of a diamond into one number. This data is culled from measurements taken by a Sarin machine. The measurements that are taken into consideration reflect actual work performed by the cutter and are not extrapolations of measurements like depth/spread percentage and crown/pavilion percentages which the cutter may or may not seek to achieve.

Which stone below is the best cut?

Put your cursor on the stone you think is cut the best and see the stone's BrayScore.

Diamond #1


Diamond #2


Diamond #3


Consumers don't always buy a product for the way it looks. If that were the case, everyone would wear fake brand name goods. They pay a premium for quality they know is there, but can't necessarily see. A BrayScore is the proof standard for quality of cut. The workmanship the cutter puts into the diamond is as durable as the diamond itself. No two diamonds are cut exactly the same.

Obtaining a BrayScore is quick and easy. Follow the three simple steps below.
Sarin Measurement (17 seconds)
Upload Report (no need to send diamond)
BrayScore (1 second)

How is the BrayScore calculated?

A BrayScore summarizes inaccuracies of the cutting process into one single number. A diamond with no cutting errors will have a score of 1000. By taking measurements of individual facets rather than averages, BrayScores are so accurate that they can tell differences between diamonds that show no visible difference. These measurements are produced by the Sarin machine and analyzed by the W.R.Bray Diamond Cut Scoring Process, Patent No. US 7136154B2.

Let's look at golf as an example of how a facet on a diamond is scored using the BrayScore method. If a golfer is to sink a long putt, what two things have to be exactly right about the rolling ball for it to fall into the hole? The answer is speed and straightness right? Well, if you would put a grid of lines over the hole both perpendicular and horizontal and assigned point deductions to each perpendicular line representing straightness and the same for the horizontal lines representing speed, then if a ball failed to go in the hole, one could easily "score"a the putt. All you would need to do is find the point on the graph and by add up the deductions for straightness, add to that the deductions for speed and subtracting from a perfect score. This is similar to how a BrayScore is achieved.